Waterside Worker

Waterside Workers transfer cargo between ships and other forms of transport or storage facilities.

Overview

Waterside Workers transfer cargo between ships and other forms of transport or storage facilities.

Day-to-day

  • receiving instructions by radio telephone and/or radio data terminal to load, unload or move cargo
  • securing and releasing mooring lines of ships
  • opening and closing ship hatches
  • transferring loads using moving equipment and directing equipment operations using communication systems
  • stacking cargo on pallets, trays, flats and slings to facilitate transfer to and from ships
  • operating heavy vehicles and machinery, such as straddle carriers, fork-lifts and ships' cranes, to load and unload cargo from trucks, ships and rail transport services
  • sorting cargo before loading and unloading
  • labelling goods with customers' details and destinations
  • loading goods into trucks, containers and rail wagons, and securing loads
  • assisting to tie down loads and covering them with tarpaulins
  • guiding truck drivers into loading bays and through confined spaces
  • performing clerical functions to record and check cargo on arrival, storage and dispatch
  • positioning goods in the holds of ships and securing cargo to prevent shifting during voyages
  • packing containers and re-packing damaged containers
  • cleaning out ships' tanks and holds
  • washing out containers and carrying out other general yard duties such as shunting on the railway
  • arranging for damaged containers of hazardous material to be quarantined
  • carrying out safety checks.

Considerations

  • physically demanding
  • requires driving
  • working outdoors.

Occupation snapshot
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Not available
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Moderate

To become a Waterside Worker

  • You can work as a Waterside Worker without formal qualifications, however, a certificate II, III in stevedoring may be useful.

Skills

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