Female Archaeologist working in field, carefully revealing ancient brickwork

Archaeologist

Archaeologists study human activity in the past, primarily through the recovery and analysis of the material culture and environmental data left behind, which includes artefacts, architecture, biofacts and cultural landscapes (the archaeological record).

Overview

Archaeologists study human activity in the past, primarily through the recovery and analysis of the material culture and environmental data left behind, which includes artefacts, architecture, biofacts and cultural landscapes (the archaeological record).

Day-to-day

  • uses aerial photography to locate sites that are suitable for excavation and/or digging (for artifacts)
  • plans and organises surveys and excavations within a particular archaeological site
  • conducts field work (digging for artifacts) using tools such as pickaxes, brushes and bulldozers
  • carries out examination, documentation and preservation of artifacts
  • performs analysis and interpretation of archaeological data and findings
  • writes reports about the data and findings for publication
  • creates virtual simulations of how artifacts or archaeological sites would have looked in the past.

Considerations

  • requires driving
  • working outdoors.

Occupation snapshot
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To become an Archaeologist

  • You need a bachelor degree in archaeology or another related field to work as an Archaeologist. It is also common to complete postgraduate studies.

    Find a Bachelor of Arts (Archaeology)

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